Thursday, December 07, 2006

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Rupee at the time of british

The first set of British India notes were the 'Victoria Portrait' Series issued in denominations of 10, 20, 50, 100, 1000. These were unifaced, carried two language panels and were printed on hand-moulded paper manufactured at the Laverstock Paper Mills (Portals). The security features incorporated the watermark (GOVERNMENT OF INDIA, RUPEES, two signatures and wavy lines), the printed signature and the registration of the note


This series remained largely unchanged till the introduction of the 'King's Portrait' series which commenced in 1923. British India Notes facilitated inter-spatial transfer of funds. As a security precaution, notes were cut in half. One set was sent by post. On confirmation of receipt, the other half Small Denomination Notes

The introduction of small denomination notes in India was essentially in the realm of the exigent. Compulsions of the first World War led to the introduction of paper currency of small denominations. Rupee One was introduced on 30th November, 1917 followed by the exotic Rupees Two and Annas Eight. The issuance of these notes was discontinued on 1st January, 1926 on cost benefit considerations. These notes first carried the portrait of King George V and were the precursors of the 'King's Portrait' Series which were to follow.was despatched by post. Regular issues of this Series carrying the portrait of George V were introduced in May, 1923 on a Ten Rupee Note. The King's Portrait Motif continued as an integral feature of all Paper Money issues of British India . Government of India continued to issue currency notes till 1935 when the Reserve Bank of India took over the functions of the Controller of Currency. These notes were issued in denominations of Rs 5, 10, 50, 100, 500, 1000, 10,000.


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Sania vs Hingis

Wednesday, December 06, 2006

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hrithik roshan performance

Friday, November 24, 2006

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20 dollar trick(shocking revelations)

Fold a $20 bill in half..




Fold again, taking care to fold it exactly as below



Fold the other end, exactly as before
Et voilĂ , the PENTAGON on fire!!



Now, simply turn it over...


The Twin Towers ablaze..




nd now... look at this!


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The most scary road in the road

Stremnaya road is called the road of death and its situated in Bolivia
just the look of it can scare anyone
Bolivia's Yungas Road is officially the most hazardous on earth. Local people pray before using it and the nearest hospital is a two-hour drive away. But none of this deters foreign tourists from biking over its bumps at 40mph. And, as Michael Liebreich discovered, cheap thrills in risky environments can come at a price.

You can't walk 100 yards down the main street of any travellers' town on this lonely planet without being offered a selection of adrenalin-enhanced adventures. A river nearby? We provide inner tubes. Mountains? Touch your own personal void. Now I'm all for getting the heart racing on holiday but my opinion of what is an appropriate adventure activity and of what constitutes an acceptable riskchanged dramatically one day last summer.









read more here

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Sand Art





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Funny faces of celebs









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Niagra falls in 1911

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1930's calcutta in pics

This is truly nostalgic I received this pics from an email